Meditations: A outlet sale New lowest Translation online sale

Meditations: A outlet sale New lowest Translation online sale

Meditations: A outlet sale New lowest Translation online sale
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Product Description

Nearly two thousand years after it was written, Meditations remains profoundly relevant for anyone seeking to lead a meaningful life.

Few ancient works have been as influential as the Meditations of Marcus Aurelius, philosopher and emperor of Rome (A.D. 161–180). A series of spiritual exercises filled with wisdom, practical guidance, and profound understanding of human behavior, it remains one of the greatest works of spiritual and ethical reflection ever written. Marcus’s insights and advice—on everything from living in the world to coping with adversity and interacting with others—have made the Meditations required reading for statesmen and philosophers alike, while generations of ordinary readers have responded to the straightforward intimacy of his style. For anyone who struggles to reconcile the demands of leadership with a concern for personal integrity and spiritual well-being, the Meditations remains as relevant now as it was two thousand years ago.

In Gregory Hays’s new translation—the first in thirty-five years—Marcus’s thoughts speak with a new immediacy. In fresh and unencumbered English, Hays vividly conveys the spareness and compression of the original Greek text. Never before have Marcus’s insights been so directly and powerfully presented.

With an Introduction that outlines Marcus’s life and career, the essentials of Stoic doctrine, the style and construction of the Meditations, and the work’s ongoing influence, this edition makes it possible to fully rediscover the thoughts of one of the most enlightened and intelligent leaders of any era.

Review

“Here, for our age, is [Marcus’s] great work presented in its entirety, strongly introduced and freshly, elegantly translated.” —Robert Fagles

From the Inside Flap

A series of spiritual exercises filled with wisdom, practical guidance, and profound understanding of human behavior, Marcus Aurelius?s Meditations remains one of the greatest works of spiritual and ethical reflection ever written. Marcus?s insights and advice?on everything from living in the world to coping with adversity and interacting with others?have made the Meditations required reading for statesmen and philosophers alike, while generations of ordinary readers have responded to the straightforward intimacy of his style.

In Gregory Hays?s new translation?the first in a generation?Marcus?s thoughts speak with a new immediacy: never before have they been so directly and powerfully presented.

From the Back Cover

A series of spiritual exercises filled with wisdom, practical guidance, and profound understanding of human behavior, Marcus Aurelius''s "Meditations remains one of the greatest works of spiritual and ethical reflection ever written. Marcus''s insights and advice--on everything from living in the world to coping with adversity and interacting with others--have made the "Meditations required reading for statesmen and philosophers alike, while generations of ordinary readers have responded to the straightforward intimacy of his style.
In Gregory Hays''s new translation--the first in a generation--Marcus''s thoughts speak with a new immediacy: never before have they been so directly and powerfully presented.

About the Author

Gregory Hays is associate professor of classics at the University of Virginia. He maintains an annotated bibliography of Fulgentius the Mythmaker.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Book 1

Debts and Lessons

1. My grandfather Verus

Character and self-control.

2. My father (from my own memories and

his reputation)

Integrity and manliness.

3. My mother

Her reverence for the divine, her generosity, her inability not only to do wrong but even to conceive of doing it. And the simple way she lived-not in the least like the rich.

4. My great-grandfather

To avoid the public schools, to hire good private teachers, and to accept the resulting costs as money well-spent.

5. My first teacher

Not to support this side or that in chariot-racing, this fighter or that in the games. To put up with discomfort and not make demands. To do my own work, mind my own business, and have no time for slanderers.

6. Diognetus

Not to waste time on nonsense. Not to be taken in by conjurors and hoodoo artists with their talk about incantations and exorcism and all the rest of it. Not to be obsessed with quail-fighting or other crazes like that. To hear unwelcome truths. To practice philosophy, and to study with Baccheius, and then with Tandasis and Marcianus. To write dialogues as a student. To choose the Greek lifestyle-the camp-bed and the cloak.

7. Rusticus

The recognition that I needed to train and discipline my character.

Not to be sidetracked by my interest in rhetoric. Not to write treatises on abstract questions, or deliver moralizing little sermons, or compose imaginary descriptions of The Simple Life or The Man Who Lives Only for Others. To steer clear of oratory, poetry and belles lettres.

Not to dress up just to stroll around the house, or things like that. To write straightforward letters (like the one he sent my mother from Sinuessa). And to behave in a conciliatory way when people who have angered or annoyed us want to make up.

To read attentively-not to be satisfied with "just getting the gist of it." And not to fall for every smooth talker.

And for introducing me to Epictetus''s lectures-and loaning me his own copy.

8. Apollonius

Independence and unvarying reliability, and to pay attention to nothing, no matter how fleetingly, except the logos. And to be the same in all circumstances-intense pain, the loss of a child, chronic illness. And to see clearly, from his example, that a man can show both strength and flexibility.

His patience in teaching. And to have seen someone who clearly viewed his expertise and ability as a teacher as the humblest of virtues.

And to have learned how to accept favors from friends without losing your self-respect or appearing ungrateful.

9. Sextus

Kindness.

An example of fatherly authority in the home. What it means to live as nature requires.

Gravity without airs.

To show intuitive sympathy for friends, tolerance to amateurs and sloppy thinkers. His ability to get along with everyone: sharing his company was the highest of compliments, and the opportunity an honor for those around him.

To investigate and analyze, with understanding and logic, the principles we ought to live by.

Not to display anger or other emotions. To be free of passion and yet full of love.

To praise without bombast; to display expertise without pretension.

10. The literary critic Alexander

Not to be constantly correcting people, and in particular not to jump on them whenever they make an error of usage or a grammatical mistake or mispronounce something, but just answer their question or add another example, or debate the issue itself (not their phrasing), or make some other contribution to the discussion-and casually insert the correct expression.

11. Fronto

To recognize the malice, cunning and hypocrisy that power produces, and the peculiar ruthlessness often shown by people from "good families."

12. Alexander the Platonist

Not to be constantly telling people (or writing them) that I''m too busy, unless I really am. Similarly, not to be always ducking my responsibilities to the people around me because of "pressing business."

13. Catulus

Not to shrug off a friend''s resentment-even unjustified resentment-but try to put things right.

To show your teachers ungrudging respect (the Domitius and Athenodotus story), and your children unfeigned love.

14. [My brother] Severus

To love my family, truth and justice. It was through him that I encountered Thrasea, Helvidius, Cato, Dion and Brutus, and conceived of a society of equal laws, governed by equality of status and of speech, and of rulers who respect the liberty of their subjects above all else.

And from him as well, to be steady and consistent in valuing philosophy.

And to help others and be eager to share, not to be a pessimist, and never to doubt your friends'' affection for you. And that when people incurred his disapproval, they always knew it. And that his friends never had to speculate about his attitude to anything: it was always clear.

15. Maximus

Self-control and resistance to distractions.

Optimism in adversity-especially illness.

A personality in balance: dignity and grace together.

Doing your job without whining.

Other people''s certainty that what he said was what he thought, and what he did was done without malice.

Never taken aback or apprehensive. Neither rash nor hesitant-or bewildered, or at a loss. Not obsequious-but not aggressive or paranoid either.

Generosity, charity, honesty.

The sense he gave of staying on the path rather than being kept on it.

That no one could ever have felt patronized by him-or in a position to patronize him.

A sense of humor.

16. My adopted father

Compassion. Unwavering adherence to decisions, once he''d reached them. Indifference to superficial honors. Hard work. Persistence.

Listening to anyone who could contribute to the public good.

His dogged determination to treat people as they deserved.

A sense of when to push and when to back off.

Putting a stop to the pursuit of boys.

His altruism. Not expecting his friends to keep him entertained at dinner or to travel with him (unless they wanted to). And anyone who had to stay behind to take care of something always found him the same when he returned.

His searching questions at meetings. A kind of single-mindedness, almost, never content with first impressions, or breaking off the discussion prematurely.

His constancy to friends-never getting fed up with them, or playing favorites.

Self-reliance, always. And cheerfulness.

And his advance planning (well in advance) and his discreet attention to even minor things.

His restrictions on acclamations-and all attempts to flatter him.

His constant devotion to the empire''s needs. His stewardship of the treasury. His willingness to take responsibility-and blame-for both.

His attitude to the gods: no superstitiousness. And his attitude to men: no demagoguery, no currying favor, no pandering. Always sober, always steady, and never vulgar or a prey to fads.

The way he handled the material comforts that fortune had supplied him in such abundance-without arrogance and without apology. If they were there, he took advantage of them. If not, he didn''t miss them.

No one ever called him glib, or shameless, or pedantic. They saw him for what he was: a man tested by life, accomplished, unswayed by flattery, qualified to govern both himself and them.

His respect for people who practiced philosophy-at least, those who were sincere about it. But without denigrating the others-or listening to them.

His ability to feel at ease with people-and put them at their ease, without being pushy.

His willingness to take adequate care of himself. Not a hypochondriac or obsessed with his appearance, but not ignoring things either. With the result that he hardly ever needed medical attention, or drugs or any sort of salve or ointment.

This, in particular: his willingness to yield the floor to experts-in oratory, law, psychology, whatever-and to support them energetically, so that each of them could fulfil his potential.

That he respected tradition without needing to constantly congratulate himself for Safeguarding Our Traditional Values.

Not prone to go off on tangents, or pulled in all directions, but sticking with the same old places and the same old things.

The way he could have one of his migraines and then go right back to what he was doing-fresh and at the top of his game.

That he had so few secrets-only state secrets, in fact, and not all that many of those.

The way he kept public actions within reasonable bounds-games, building projects, distributions of money and so on-because he looked to what needed doing and not the credit to be gained from doing it.

No bathing at strange hours, no self-indulgent building projects, no concern for food, or the cut and color of his clothes, or having attractive slaves. (The robe from his farm at Lorium, most of the things at Lanuvium, the way he accepted the customs agent''s apology at Tusculum, etc.)

He never exhibited rudeness, lost control of himself, or turned violent. No one ever saw him sweat. Everything was to be approached logically and with due consideration, in a calm and orderly fashion but decisively, and with no loose ends.

You could have said of him (as they say of Socrates) that he knew how to enjoy and abstain from things that most people find it hard to abstain from and all too easy to enjoy. Strength, perseverance, self-control in both areas: the mark of a soul in readiness-indomitable.

(Maximus''s illness.)

17. The Gods

That I had good grandparents, a good mother and father, a good sister, good teachers, good servants, relatives, friends-almost without exception. And that I never lost control of myself with any of them, although I had it in me to do that, and I might have, easily. But thanks to the gods, I was never put in that position, and so escaped the test.

That I wasn''t raised by my grandfather''s girlfriend for longer than I was. That I didn''t lose my virginity too early, and didn''t enter adulthood until it was time-put it off, even.

That I had someone-as a ruler and as a father-who could keep me from being arrogant and make me realize that even at court you can live without a troop of bodyguards, and gorgeous clothes, lamps, sculpture-the whole charade. That you can behave almost like an ordinary person without seeming slovenly or careless as a ruler or when carrying out official obligations.

That I had the kind of brother I did. One whose character challenged me to improve my own. One whose love and affection enriched my life.

That my children weren''t born stupid or physically deformed.

That I wasn''t more talented in rhetoric or poetry, or other areas. If I''d felt that I was making better progress I might never have given them up.

That I conferred on the people who brought me up the honors they seemed to want early on, instead of putting them off (since they were still young) with the hope that I''d do it later.

That I knew Apollonius, and Rusticus, and Maximus.

That I saw was shown clearly and often what it would be like to live as nature requires. The gods did all they could-through their gifts, their help, their inspiration-to ensure that I could live as nature demands. And if I''ve failed, it''s no one''s fault but mine. Because I didn''t pay attention to what they told me-to what they taught me, practically, step by step.

That my body has held out, especially considering the life I''ve led.

That I never laid a finger on Benedicta or on Theodotus. And that even later, when I was overcome by passion, I recovered from it.

That even though I was often upset with Rusticus I never did anything I would have regretted later.

That even though she died young, at least my mother spent her last years with me.

That whenever I felt like helping someone who was short of money, or otherwise in need, I never had to be told that I had no resources to do it with. And that I was never put in that position myself-of having to take something from someone else.

That I have the wife I do: obedient, loving, humble.

That children had competent teachers.

Remedies granted through dreams-when I was coughing blood, for instance, and having fits of dizziness. And the one at Caieta.

That when I became interested in philosophy I didn''t fall into the hands of charlatans, and didn''t get bogged down in writing treatises, or become absorbed by logic-chopping, or preoccupied with physics.

All things for which "we need the help of fortune and the gods."

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Top reviews from the United States

Nom de Bloom
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A word of caution
Reviewed in the United States on July 23, 2016
Amazon lumps different translations together as merely variations on how the book is delivered. In this case, the Hays translation is the hardcover, while the authors who translated the paperback and Kindle versions aren''t specified. So use the tools available (look inside,... See more
Amazon lumps different translations together as merely variations on how the book is delivered. In this case, the Hays translation is the hardcover, while the authors who translated the paperback and Kindle versions aren''t specified. So use the tools available (look inside, free sample) to get an idea of the language used by the author and see if it''s something you''d like to read, or if a different translation suits you better.
2,344 people found this helpful
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Aaron
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A much needed update to the Meditations.
Reviewed in the United States on November 10, 2018
My wife enjoys listening to me read to her while she is falling asleep. When I finally got to Marcus Aurelius'' Meditations on my reading list, I was excited to read it all the through instead of just a couple of excerpts every now and then. When I purchased one of the older... See more
My wife enjoys listening to me read to her while she is falling asleep. When I finally got to Marcus Aurelius'' Meditations on my reading list, I was excited to read it all the through instead of just a couple of excerpts every now and then. When I purchased one of the older translations I almost couldn''t understand what I was saying when reading it aloud to myself. I hoped she wouldn''t notice and just think I''m super smart for reading such profound text... But she didn''t. "What are we reading?" she exclaimed. I new at that time, for both me and her, I had to find a better translation.

To no avail I only found more and more of either the same translation from years ago or even older. I''m sure they worked for their time, but was getting discouraged because I would have to take more time on an already heavy book.

After taking a break, I was listening to Chris Fisher''s podcast called, "Traditional Stoicism," he mentioned Gregory Hayes'' translation being much more accessible to the modern reader.

I bought it instantly and devoured it. I''m on my second reading now highlighting even more text than before.
SO MUCH EASIER!

As a person who practices Stoicism daily, I highly recommend this edition for its smoothness and updated translation.
269 people found this helpful
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Miguel Ernesto Sosa
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A decent sized book... for an 8-foot tall Sasquatch
Reviewed in the United States on January 22, 2021
This review is for this particular print, and not the Greg Hays translation. I was very much looking forward to receiving this book based on positive reviews (which I have not read). When I opened the package I was quite preplexed: Think back to your childhood,... See more
This review is for this particular print, and not the Greg Hays translation.

I was very much looking forward to receiving this book based on positive reviews (which I have not read). When I opened the package I was quite preplexed: Think back to your childhood, and recall the largest coloring book that you owned. Now imagine trying to read that book with a wingspan basically as wide as your shoulders. That is how large this book is.

To be fair, the dimensions are listed, but in counterpoint I never thought I''d need to check its size on the off-chance that it was printed on a press previously used for world atlases. I included a picture to show just how ridiculous it is, in the hopes that others are spared this oversized embarrassment of a print run.
79 people found this helpful
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Donald
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Thoughtful Guide
Reviewed in the United States on July 30, 2019
This work is a collection of writings by Marcus Aurelius, a Roman emperor at the height of the Empire. He is known as the Caesar-philosopher. I became interested in Meditations after reading Ten Caesars, which introduced Marcus Aurelius as the Roman emperor from... See more
This work is a collection of writings by Marcus Aurelius, a Roman emperor at the height of the Empire. He is known as the Caesar-philosopher.

I became interested in Meditations after reading Ten Caesars, which introduced Marcus Aurelius as the Roman emperor from 8 March 161 to 17 March 180, and as a Stoic philosopher. I have read about what the Romans did, but knew little of what they thought. However, selecting Meditations for this purpose was not the best choice. First, Marcus was a Caesar, hardly representative of the common Roman. And with his thoughtful bent, neither was Marcus representative as a Caesar. In spite of this misguided purpose, I found the book a treasure.

Many other publications of Meditations are available. This one contains a newer translation and a helpful introduction by translator/author Gregory Hays that provides a summary primer on Stoicism. With little background in ancient philosophy, I opted for this version. Although the translation was easily understood in modern terms, I wondered about several anachronisms that might have been inserted for the reader’s convenience.

Organization. The organization of Marcus’s material was very similar to other translations. Little insight was provided on the document organization (if any) that Marcus intended.

Style. Much of this book was written as if Marcus is having a dialog with, or creating a guide for himself.

Content. The Roman study of philosophy was taken seriously. Reflecting this, Meditations deals with major questions about life and death, how to live, and finding a purpose for one’s life. For example, Marcus thought about the soul, time, the mind, change, nature, good, risk, happiness, remembrance, prayer, fate, and gratefulness. Roman religion in Marcus’s time was polytheistic. (Although Christianity existed, it was not mainstream.) It seemed that Marcus’s principles for living did not conflict with Roman religion.

Summary. Although somewhat brief and at times sketchy, Meditations contains seeds of thought on the central issues of human existence. True to its title, this book leaves the reader much to think about. I would benefit from reading it again.
59 people found this helpful
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James
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Flat translation, inferior to original
Reviewed in the United States on July 28, 2020
I don''t like to do this, but I just want to warn others like me. I''ve had five copies of the Meditations so far, because every time I get one I hand it out and it never comes back. So it goes. I won''t say this translation is technically bad, but I hate it. It''s not the... See more
I don''t like to do this, but I just want to warn others like me. I''ve had five copies of the Meditations so far, because every time I get one I hand it out and it never comes back. So it goes.
I won''t say this translation is technically bad, but I hate it. It''s not the original and it reads like something for a child. The word choice and translation style remove all of the soul I love about it.
The author also includes an introduction almost half as long as the book itself. I''ll let that speak for itself.
If you''re like me and you want the original translation, or just care about having the best experience with the book, do not get this version.
46 people found this helpful
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K. Carter
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
"Profound" Doesn''t Do It Justice
Reviewed in the United States on June 18, 2020
You can open this masterpiece to any random page, read just ONE passage, and realize something incredible which may be contemplated for hours, days, weeks or years. One sentence may alter the way you think and act - even something you may have read previously can come into... See more
You can open this masterpiece to any random page, read just ONE passage, and realize something incredible which may be contemplated for hours, days, weeks or years. One sentence may alter the way you think and act - even something you may have read previously can come into a new focus on subsequent reading. The depth of observation and thoughts brought to bear in these pages can make you feel simultaneously meaningless and infinite. It is crazy! If another example exists where so much meaning can be gleaned from so few words, I do not know it. What a wondrous work of wisdom this is. If I could only have access to a few books for the rest of my life, this would be one of them. If the insight contained in these pages could somehow be downloaded into every human being on the planet, we would see the problems we cause for ourselves evaporate in short order. Selfishness, short-sightedness, hatred, intolerance, ignorance and the misguided adherence to "religious" messengers who no longer even pretend to follow the teachings of their prophets, it could all start to dissolve if we could think so highly as Aurelius. The fact that this was not written for any audience beyond Aurelius himself is hard for me to fathom. I wish I could thank him, and every teacher he ever had.
26 people found this helpful
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Toothpick101
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Defective Both Times :(
Reviewed in the United States on November 17, 2019
Super disappointed that Amazon was the only place I could find this exact version. I bought it as a Christmas present for my boyfriend and would have really liked to see the product before I bought it. The first time I returned it because it had glue along the top pages and... See more
Super disappointed that Amazon was the only place I could find this exact version. I bought it as a Christmas present for my boyfriend and would have really liked to see the product before I bought it. The first time I returned it because it had glue along the top pages and trying to pick it off would have damaged the book. I just received the exchange and it’s got a big grease stain on the top that soaks through into the hard cover of the book and greasy fingerprints all over the front cover. Terrible quality and not fit for a present I would ever give someone.
35 people found this helpful
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Juan Pablo Rodriguez
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Simple but life-changing introduction to STOICISM
Reviewed in the United States on July 24, 2018
The GOOD: It is clear why individuals like Tim Ferris and his many podcasts guests boast about Meditations, the book is, as one might say, a controversial look at principles that should direct any individuals actions, the book will bring forth some cognitive dissonance to... See more
The GOOD: It is clear why individuals like Tim Ferris and his many podcasts guests boast about Meditations, the book is, as one might say, a controversial look at principles that should direct any individuals actions, the book will bring forth some cognitive dissonance to some, to be thankful for the opportunity given by a disaster or difficult life event seems to be obfuscating for some in terms of how they should handle any given situation. This book will provide a look into what I think is an absolutely necessary philosophy in life: stoicism. You will leave this book with a different perspective and those who do not, need to have another read, it personally helped me get through a difficult life event regarding finances.

The Bad: The translation is wonderful and simple to read, it is one adored by many, the only bad thing I would say which is more of something expected of a book that is characteristically for a higher lexile, it is difficult to understand some of the meditations Marcus Aurelius writes about, the good thing is this allows you the reader to interpret the words as you see fit, I would also say some of the book is
repetitive, which may repel any reader already well informed about stoicism.
15 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Arupratan
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
About Various Translations of "Meditations"
Reviewed in India on June 4, 2019
"What am I doing with my soul?" This collection of sublime thoughts compiled as a book (originally titled as "Eis Heauton", meaning: "To Himself"; original language was Greek) has never gone out of print since circa AD 161. The writer, Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, was a Roman...See more
"What am I doing with my soul?" This collection of sublime thoughts compiled as a book (originally titled as "Eis Heauton", meaning: "To Himself"; original language was Greek) has never gone out of print since circa AD 161. The writer, Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, was a Roman emperor and the most renowned stoic philosopher of antiquity. My review though is not about the book itself but about the various available translations of the book. There are three noted translations which are most readily available in market: 1. A. S. L. Farquharson''s Everyman''s Library hardcover edition. 2. Martin Hammond''s Penguin Classics edition. 3. Gregory Hays'' Modern Library edition. The first one is the most revered edition published in 1944. Though the physical appearance of this edition is the most eye-catching with an elegantly produced hardcover binding and handsome printing, the translation seems dated and old-fashioned. If you want to exhibit your book collection in front of people, you may buy this edition. Though for reading pleasure and better understanding of the philosophy, I''ll not recommend it. The second edition by Penguin (2006) is better than the Farquharson''s as far as readability is concerned, but avoid this one too. This translation is more inclined to the exactness of the original text than the readability or understandability of the writing. As it seems, this is the bestselling edition of "Meditations" as far as the Amazon''s Indian website is concerned. Thanks to the Penguin Classics tag attached to it, perhaps. No matter what, this is NOT the best edition in comparison. The last edition which is by Hays (2002), in my opinion (and as per the general consensus as well), is the best edition available. This is the most comprehensible translation of "Meditations" for the modern readers. The language is fluid and contemporary. If you want to study the thoughts of Aurelius more profoundly then get this Gregory Hays edition, paperback published by Modern Library (snapshots attached).
193 people found this helpful
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Mike Little
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The paperback and ebook are NOT the same edition!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 19, 2021
I pre-ordered the ebook edition, then noticed the paperback was available immediately and cheap. So I ordered that too. These are NOT the same book! The paperback is a print on demand version of the 2002 translation by Gregory Hays and includes an introduction, endnotes,...See more
I pre-ordered the ebook edition, then noticed the paperback was available immediately and cheap. So I ordered that too. These are NOT the same book! The paperback is a print on demand version of the 2002 translation by Gregory Hays and includes an introduction, endnotes, and index of persons. The print is badly formatted in parts (see messed up fonts in 2nd photo) with some low quality sections (see 1st photo). The Kindle version does not credit the translator at all and includes no introduction or notes. But seems to be a more literal translation (likely by someone else). For example: Photo 3 from the paperback Hays translation: "1. From my Grandfather Verus. Character and self-control." Photo 4 from the kindle version: "From my grandfather Verus I learned good morals and the government of my temper." Amazon sort this out! They are not the same product. I''ve still given it 3 stars as I will likely use both versions. In effect the paperback is a study notes summary of the longer translation in the ebook.
16 people found this helpful
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vivek mishra
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One of the best eye-opening book I ever read but not for those who are unfamiliar of stoicism.
Reviewed in India on October 4, 2020
There are many translations available of meditation book, I would like to suggest everyone to buy the book Published by modern library edition which is written by Gregory hay, it has a great introduction and translation. Now coming to book, it''s actually not a book but a...See more
There are many translations available of meditation book, I would like to suggest everyone to buy the book Published by modern library edition which is written by Gregory hay, it has a great introduction and translation. Now coming to book, it''s actually not a book but a personal diary of Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius who used to follow stoic philosophy. Paper quality is avg and can be improved but you can''t expect much in 300-400rs. To understand his views and ideas you should have basic idea of stoicism and for that i would suggest you to buy guide to good life by Irvine which gives overall view of stoicism and how to implement those ideas in your life. Also if you really like the idea of stoicism and want to read more i would suggest to read seneca letters and Epictetus discourse. I consider myself very lucky that i got introduced to stoicism and it really changed my whole perspective, it''s just like gita where you can find timeless wisdom, and I''m going to use it''s quote in daily life here are few which i liked most: 1)You have power over your mind - not outside events. Realize this, and you will find strength. 2)Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth. 3)If you are distressed by anything external, the pain is not due to the thing itself, but to your estimate of it; and this you have the power to revoke at any moment. 4)When you arise in the morning think of what a privilege it is to be alive, to think, to enjoy, to love ... 5)Never let the future disturb you. You will meet it, if you have to, with the same weapons of reason which today arm you against the present. Thank you for reading my review, I hope it gave you overview of the book and if you know any more great books then please suggest more books on stoic philosophy.
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M. Rance
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Kindle edition linked here is NOT the Hays translation
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 21, 2021
I believe the other reviewer noting that this Kindle edition is not the Hays translation from 2002 is correct. It appears to be the George Long translation from 1862. That''s right, 1862. It is poorly formatted and cheaply done. There is no mention of the translator nor the...See more
I believe the other reviewer noting that this Kindle edition is not the Hays translation from 2002 is correct. It appears to be the George Long translation from 1862. That''s right, 1862. It is poorly formatted and cheaply done. There is no mention of the translator nor the publisher for that matter. It looks like in order to purchase a Kindle edition of the Hays translation you have to seek it out separately on your Kindle device or in the Kindle store, but at the moment (March 2021) the one linked to the paperback and hardcover editions of the Hays translation on Amazon is not that book.
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Daniel Malpas
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Essential reading
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 18, 2021
I haven''t really read since high school. I just don''t have the attention span. But this book, with all of Marcus'' meditations in easy-to-consume entries, made it extremely friendly for me. The meditations themselves are brilliant. I found myself agreeing with so much of the...See more
I haven''t really read since high school. I just don''t have the attention span. But this book, with all of Marcus'' meditations in easy-to-consume entries, made it extremely friendly for me. The meditations themselves are brilliant. I found myself agreeing with so much of the book, and before even the third book/chapter it had managed to change my viewpoint on some of life''s questions and problems. It''s brought me back into reading and given me some brilliant new ways to view life. I can''t recommend it enough. As a product, It''s wonderful. The book was in mint condition, the spine is very loose making it really easy to keep open and flip pages, and the price was well worth it. I hear that this translation, by Gregory Hays, is also the best of them all.
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